OPC Committee on Diaconal Ministries
 
 
 
Helping to Train, Encourage & Connect Deacons
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 The Latest

Meet Your Fellow Deacon Pete Hybert

By Allison Hill, Administrative Assistant for the OPC Committee on Diaconal Ministries

Pete Hybert has been a deacon at Bethel OPC, Wheaton, IL since 1993, and privileged to have a front-row seat to watch the Lord work in many people’s lives. His take-away from it all? Amazement. He says, “You get to see the Lord work. Sometimes it’s not what you expected, but it’s still amazing.”

Pete’s stint as a deacon includes a period when he was the sole deacon. He’s helped walk-ins with various short-term needs, church members with long-term needs and those seeking assistance with a tragedy or disaster. Each situation poses a unique opportunity to see the Lord’s hand of mercy work through the local church. For Pete, this is even true in situations in which it seems there is little headway and temporary discouragement.

Pete knows that it is a privilege to be a small part of demonstrating mercy in tangible ways. That is what he says drew him to mercy ministry. “What I like about diaconal work is the practical side of it.” Pete currently works as a full-time consultant but describes himself as a “jack-of-all trades”. From fast food to working in construction, Pete has found that his wide background and the diverse experiences of his fellow deacons helps them all minister and relate to many.

Mindful of the power of sacrificial giving Pete says with humble confidence, “It’s not that we are genius deacons, and it’s not about trying to do it all. It’s about doing what you can.” “[If] you are able to share time with people, do something that matters to them in the immediate term, and you can talk to them while you do it. That’s what I like about it.” While the goal is to foster independence, “Getting to know people and have them understand their God-given value as an image-bearer [is] something only speaking with them can do [and] it gives you a heart to pray for their salvation.”

Though there have been memorable times of fellowship in helping people move or pumping out flooded basements, Pete has a heart for serving those with disabilities. He and his wife, Faith, a former special needs educator assistant, both have considerable experience caring for and working with people who have long-term needs and disabilities. Serving those individuals and helping them succeed in their own capacities is one of the most enjoyable types of mercy ministry for him. “I try to encourage them and end up being encouraged by them. It’s been rewarding to do what is in our reach to come alongside them.” There is one member of the congregation with long-term needs Pete gratefully says, fuels his work.

“Of course we are willing to help others that we may never see again, but it’s nice to serve people you see and can continue to minister to, physically and spiritually, even when there is little hope of their situation changing.” The ultimate goal is building biblically-founded relationships with people over time.

“It’s always great to see results: growth or even change,” Pete says. As deacons, there is great joy in observing the hand of the Lord in the lives of those you serve.


Read more...

Coming Together as Deacons: NDS IV 2022

photo by OPC Member, Katie Plas

As many of you know, the OPC National Diaconal Summits have always been an exciting time for the OPC Committee on Diaconal Ministries. This year was no different. Nearly 200 men (deacons, deacons-in-training, elders, and pastors) traveled to Wheaton, Illinois for our fourth National Diaconal Summit, June 2-4. The purpose of the Summit is straight-forward: training, encouragement, and refreshment to strengthen the brotherhood of deacons. I had the unique privilege of attending the Summit, as the OPC CDM’s Communications Coordinator. 

The Summit agenda gave time for instruction during plenary sessions and then again in small group workshops. Mealtimes, where men sat with other deacons from their presbyteries and end-of-the-day free time allowed for men to get to know one another in a casual setting. The entire experience has proven in the past to be a unique one. But this conference isn’t just about formal learning. It’s about building comradery, deepening relationships, and finding there is diaconal strength in numbers. 

On Friday evening, I had the amazing opportunity to fall into a lengthy conversation with deacon Rob Moser, a warm, well-spoken, unassuming man from Grace and Peace OPC in California, MD. I knew Rob, or at least I thought I did. I had met him via Zoom when his local church reached out to OPC Disaster Response for a member of their church, whose house had flooded and needed repair. But now was an opportunity to talk face to face. 

After sitting down in a lounge area in Fischer Hall on the Wheaton College campus, Rob readily shared with me the tragic story of his only son who died from a heroin overdose. He’s surprisingly open about it, in the hopes that others can be encouraged, but admittedly, I was caught off-guard. Rob described the battle with their son over his addiction as being exhausting, both physically and financially. He related the years of torment and then the tragic end, where his son was found on the couch, in their home. The battle was finally over, but in its wake, left unimaginable pain for his wife, his daughter and him. Throughout this tumultuous time, Rob was open with his church, and they supported the Mosers, in love and in prayer. 

It’s been six years of grief now, but Rob, through the sadness, seems uniquely energized by what has happened. He knows the Lord has sustained and grown him. This tragedy has, by God’s grace, allowed him to reach out in a distinctive way in an area of town near his home, known for drugs and deep desperation. Rob recounted how he met a young woman hanging around a store, begging for money. He got her something to eat and she quickly confided in him that she was an addict, that she wanted very badly to get help, and added, “you probably wouldn’t understand.” Of course, Rob knew all too well and God was using Rob’s story to open a door. 

The woman explained that she had a job interview coming up and needed proper clothes. He offered to take her to the store, and stressed that it was, “in the name of Jesus.” He explained that the money for the clothes (and the meal she had just eaten) would come from his church. She was receptive and even expressed interest in attending church with him the next day. Sadly, Rob never saw her after that night, even after some searching. He’s encouraged to know that a seed had been planted. 

As I listened, I realized, this kind of conversation can’t happen remotely. It made me thankful for Rob’s openness and the reminder that the Lord uses all our challenges for His good. This is one big part of what the Summit is about, and I imagined conversations something like this happening frequently over those three days.

The Summit ended on Saturday, after lunch and some final goodbyes. Mine and Rob’s included. 

Please pray with the CDM that that the deacons who attended were encouraged and readied for the challenges of their Kingdom work in the local church, and that long-term relationships were begun.

 


Read more...

CDM Meeting in Clarkston, Georgia

The Committee on Diaconal Ministries met for their

stated bi-annual meetings on April 7–8. This year, they met at

Redeemer OPC in Atlanta, Georgia, the hosting church for

the Clarkston Refugee Ministry, which the CDM supports.

This meeting was an opportunity for many of the members

of the CDM to visit the refugee ministry for the first

time. “[Pastors Weldeyesus and Tamirat’s] fervor for the gospel

and their heart for people was wonderful to experience.

Clearly they have a gift for reaching into the lives of those

who have lost country, home, and precious relationships,”

shared committee member Ron de Ru.

CDM member Seth Long agreed. “I was most impressed

with sitting in the living rooms of families who have fled persecution

and danger . . . and the ways they are desiring to now

provide for their families in a land and culture much different

from their own. It was truly wonderful to see how the Lord in

his good providence is gathering families to be connected to

the gospel outreach work of the church, caring for the spiritual

and physical needs of the stranger in our midst.”
[This article was originally published in the June 2022 Edition of New Horizons]

Read more...